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kelime videoları

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC91Wrsi_25Ts3280rX8CLDw                                               ...

19 Ekim 2015 Pazartesi

Arabic- English Visual dictionary

Arabic- English Visual dictionary

https://yadi.sk/i/VDxjxbJujqb2g





A World with No Boundaries (Ghazal 363)

A World with No Boundaries (Ghazal 363)
by Mevlana Jelaluddin Rumi

English version by Kabir Helminski
Original Language Persian/Farsi


With every breath the sound
of love surrounds us,
and we are bound for the depths
of space, without distraction.

We've been in orbit before
and know the angels there.
Let's go there again, Master,
for that is our land.

Yet we are beyond all of that
and more than angels.
Out beyond duality,
we have a home, and it is Majesty.
That pure substance is
different from this dusty world.
What kind of place is this?
We once came down; soon we'll return.
A new happiness befriends us
as we work at offering our lives.

Muhammad, the jewel of the world,
is our caravan's chosen guide.
The sweetness we breathe on the wind
is from the scent of his hair,
and the radiance of our thought
is from the light of his day.

His face once caused
the moon to split in two.
She couldn't endure the sight of him.
Yet how lucky she was,
she who humbly received him.
Look into your heart and see
the splitting moon within each breath.
Having seen that vision,
how can you still dream?

When the wave of "Am I not?" struck,
it wrecked the body's ship;
when the ship wrecks again,
it will be the time of union.

The Human Being, like a bird of the sea,
emerged from the ocean of the soul.
Earth is not the final place of rest
for a bird born from the sea.

No, we are pearls of that ocean;
all of us live in it;
and if it weren't so, why would
wave upon wave arrive?

This is the time of union,
the time of eternal beauty.
It is the time of luck and kindness;
it is the ocean of purity.
The wave of bestowal has come.

The roar of the sea is here.
The morning of happiness has dawned.
No, it is the light of God.

Whose face is pictured here?
Who is this shah or prince?
Who is this ancient intelligence?
They are all masks . . .
and the only remedy is
this boiling ecstasy of the soul.

A fountain of refreshment
is in the head and the eyes --
not this bodily head
but another pure spiritual one.

Many a pure head has been spilled
in the dust. Know the one from the other!
Our original head is hidden,
while this other is visible.
Beyond this world is a world
that has no boundaries.

Put your water skin away, brother,
and draw some wine from our cask!
The clay jug of perception
has such a narrow spout.
The sun appeared from the direction of Tabriz,
and I said, "This light is at once joined
with all things, and yet apart from everything."

The Economist - October 17

The Economist - October 17

https://yadi.sk/i/mJZGgziLjqPUC



ACONTINENT separates the
blood-soaked battlefields
of Syria from the reefs and
shoals that litter the South China
Sea. In their different ways,
however, both places are witnessingthe
most significant shift
in great-power relations since
the collapse of the Soviet Union.
In Syria, for the first time since the cold war, Russia has deployed
its forces far from home to quell a revolution and support
a client regime. In the waters between Vietnam and the
Philippines, America will soon signal that itdoes not recognise
China’s territorial claims over a host of outcrops and reefs by
exercising its right to sail within the 12-mile maritime limit that
a sovereign state controls.
For the past 25 years America has utterly dominated greatpower
politics. Increasingly, it lives in a contested world. The
newgame with Russia and China that isunfolding in Syria and
the South China Sea is a taste of the struggle ahead.
Facts on the ground
As ever, that struggle is being fought partly in terms of raw
power. VladimirPutin has intervened in Syria to tamp down jihadism
and to bolster his own standing at home. But he also
means to showthat, unlike America, Russia can be trusted to
get things done in the Middle East and win friends by, for example,
offering Iraq an alternative to the United States (see
page 51). Lest anyone presume with John McCain, an American
senator, that Russia is just “a gas station masquerading as a
country”, Mr Putin intends to prove that Russia possesses resolve,
aswell as cracktroops and cruise missiles.
The struggle is also over legitimacy. Mr Putin wants to discredit
America’s stewardship of the international order. America
argues that popular discontent and the Syrian regime’s
abuses of human rights disqualify the president, Bashar al-
Assad, from power. Mr Putin wants to play down human
rights, which he sees as a licence for the West to interfere in
sovereign countries—including, if he everhad to impose a brutal
crackdown, in Russia itself.
Power and legitimacy are no less at play in the South China
Sea, a thoroughfare for much of the world’s seaborne trade.
Manyof its islands, reefs and sandbanks are subject to overlapping
claims. YetChina insists that its case should prevail, and is
imposing its own claim by using landfill and by putting down
airstrips and garrisons.
This is partly an assertion of rapidly growing naval might:
China is creating islands because it can. Occupying them fits
into its strategy of dominating the seas well beyond its coast.
Twenty years ago American warships sailed there with impunity;
today they find themselves in potentially hostile waters
(see pages 64-66). But a principle is at stake, too. America does
not take a viewon who owns the islands, but it does insist that
China should establish its claims through negotiation or international
arbitration. China is asserting that in its region, for the
island disputes as in other things, it nowsets the rules.
Nobodyshould wonder that America’spre-eminence is being
contested. After the Soviet collapse the absolute global supremacy
of the United States sometimes began to seem normal.
In fact, its dominance reached such heights only because
Russia was reeling and China was still emerging from the chaos
and depredations that had so diminished it in the 20th century.
Even today, America remains the only country able to
project power right across the globe. (As we have recently argued,
its sway over the financial system is still growing.)
There is nevertheless reason to worry. The reassertion of
Russian power spells trouble. It has already led to the annexation
of Crimea and the invasion of eastern Ukraine—both
breaches ofthe very same international lawthatMrPutin says
he upholds in Syria (see page 60). Barack Obama, America’s
president, takes comfort from Russia’sweak economy and the
emigration of some of its best people. But a declining nucleararmed
former superpower can cause a lot ofharm.
Relations between China and America are more important—
and even harder to manage. For the sake of peace and
prosperity, the two must be able to work together. And yet
their dealings are inevitably plagued by rivalry and mistrust.
Because every transaction risks becoming a test ofwhich one
calls the shots, antagonism is never far belowthe surface.
American foreign policy has not yet adjusted to this contested
world. For the past three presidents, policy has chiefly
involved the export of American values—although, to the
countries on the receiving end, that sometimes felt like an imposition.
The idea was that countries would inevitably gravitate
towards democracy, markets and human rights. Optimists
thought that even China was heading in that direction.
Still worth it
That notion has suffered, first in Iraq and Afghanistan and now
the wider Middle East. Liberation has not brought stability. Democracy
has not taken root. Mr Obama has seemed to conclude
that America should pull back. In Libya he led from behind;
in Syria he has held off. As a result, he has ceded Russia
the initiative in the Middle East for the first time since the 1970s.
All those, like this newspaper, who still see democracy and
markets as the route to peace and prosperity hope that America
will be more willing to lead. Mr Obama’s wish that other
countries should share responsibility for the system of international
law and human rights will work only if his country
sets the agenda and takes the initiative—as it did with Iran’snuclear
programme. The new game will involve tough diplomacy
and the occasional judicious application of force.
America still has resources other powers lack. Foremost is
its web of alliances, including NATO. Whereas Mr Obama
sometimes behaves as if alliances are transactional, they need
solid foundations. America’s military power is unmatched,
but it is hindered by pork-barrel politics and automatic cuts
mandated byCongress. These spring from the biggestbrake on
American leadership: dysfunctional politics in Washington.
That is not just a pooradvertisement fordemocracy; it also stymies
America’s interest. In the new game it is something that
the United States—and the world—can ill afford.

Time - october 2015

Time - october 2015

https://yadi.sk/i/eqzkMaszjqPAG

POLITICS AND DIPLOMACY ARE
never easy in the world’s most volatile
region, but the alternative is always
messier: In Syria, a quarter-million
dead since 2011. In war-torn Yemen,
millions going hungry. And in Israel,
the showcase for the choice between
talking and killing, killing is winning
again, with 37 dead in the space of
two weeks, most of them Palestinians.
Of the seven Jewish Israelis who died
through Oct. 14 in the latest spasm
of violence, a majority were slain
by kitchen knives, the only weapon
at hand for many Palestinians—the
newest wrinkle in a very old story.
The conflict that for decades accounted
for most of the trouble in
the Middle East has spilled back into
the streets, where passions replace
talking points and violence threatens
to once again pass for discourse.
It’s difficult to say where the new
violence will lead, but it’s taken two
distinct forms. The more familiar is
the daily protests at Israeli military
checkpoints. Young Palestinians throw
stones and burn tires at the heavily
reinforced gates built to confine
them. Israeli soldiers fire back. The
results are often lethal—at least five
Palestinians have been killed in such
clashes since Oct. 1—but the dynamic
is routine. This particular back-andforth
dates to 1987, when Palestinians
first took to the streets to “shake
off” Israel’s military occupation of
the West Bank and Gaza Strip, the
territories they had retreated to after
losing conventional wars in 1948 and
again in 1967, when Israel stationed
the troops who are still there

Çince -fransızca olarak-

Çince   -fransızca olarak-

https://yadi.sk/i/vxQQrGJijqNcd




İngilizce fiiller

İngilizce fiiller





İspanyolcada fiiller

İspanyolcada fiiller







Ben sanırdım âlem içre bana hiç yâr kalmadı

Ben sanırdım âlem içre bana hiç yâr kalmadı
Ben beni terk eyledim bildim ki ağyâr kalmadı

Cümle eşyâda göründüm hâr var gülzâr yok
Hep gülistân oldu âlem şimdi hiç hâr kalmadı

Gece gündüz zâr u efgân eyleyip inlerdi dil
Bilmezem noldu kesildi âh ile zâr kalmadı

Gitti kesret geldi vahdet oldu halvet dost ile
Hep Hak oldu cümle âlem şehr ü bazâr kalmadı

Din diyanet âdet ü şöhret kamu vardı yele
Ey Niyâzî noldu sende kayd-ı dindâr kalmadı

Niyazî-i Mısrî



English version by Jennifer Ferraro & Latif Bolat
I thought that in this whole world
      no beloved for me remained.
Then I left myself.
      Now no stranger in the world remains.
I used to see in every object a thorn
      but never a rose–
the universe became a rose garden.
      Not a single thorn remains.
Day and night my heart
      was moaning “Ahhh!”
I don’t know how it happened–
      now no “Ahhh” remains.
Duality went, Unity came.
      I met with the Friend in private;
The multitude left, the One came.
      Only the One remains.
Religion, piety, custom, reputation–
      these used to matter greatly to me.
O Niyazi — what has happened to you?
      No trace of religion now remains.

15 Ekim 2015 Perşembe

İngilizce Kelime Ezberleme Kartları

İngilizce Kelime Ezberleme Kartları



https://yadi.sk/d/KusLZIANjkWDf

Bulgarca

Bulgarca

https://yadi.sk/i/R3TaKA4kjkUta


Bulgarian is an Indo-European language. More specifically, it, together with the languages
of the former Yugoslavia, is a member of the southern branch of the Slavic family within Indo-
European. These South Slavic languages have developed in unique ways, distinguishing them
from the northern (both East and West) Slavic languages, having become separated from these
northern relatives due to geographical features and distance and the barrier created by intervening
non-Slavic-speaking peoples (i.e. those in present-day Rumania, Hungary and Austria) and due to
contact with the non-Slavic languages of the Balkans. Contemporary Bulgarian itself has evolved
from Old Bulgarian, the southernmost member of the early South Slavic dialects/languages.
It was a southern dialect of Old Bulgarian that formed the basis for the earliest written
Slavic literary language, which is generally referred to in English as “Old Church Slavic” or “Old
Church Slavonic”. This literary language was developed by the scholars (and brothers) Cyril and
Methodius, who, in the second half of the ninth century, were set with the task of helping to spread
Christianity among Slavs farther to the north in a language that would be familiar to them. They
developed a unique alphabet, Glagolitic, and they, and later their followers, translated many
religious works into this literary language. The history of the spread of Old Bulgarian, in this
literary Old Church Slavic form, and the degree to which it influenced later literary language
developments in South Slavic, East Slavic, to a lesser degree West Slavic, and even non-Slavic
languages is complex. In Bulgaria itself the Glagolitic alphabet was supplanted over the course of
a couple centuries by a new alphabet, which was to a significant degree based on the Greek
alphabet, and which was named in honor of Cyril (i.e. the Cyrillic alphabet).
The contemporary Bulgarian literary language is largely the result of a process of
standardization that began in the 19th century as the country was emerging from nearly 500 years
of Ottoman rule. This process was one of dispute and eventual compromise between those who
wanted the modern standard language to be based primarily on the more traditional Church
Slavonic language and those who believed it should be based more on the contemporary spoken
language, which, naturally, had undergone many extremely significant changes over the centuries.
And, especially within the latter camp, there was disagreement as to whether western or eastern
dialects should be the primary base of the new standard literary language. Although there was
much compromise, it can be said as a generalization that those favoring contemporary eastern
usage emerged as the primary winners in these disputes. Since that time, however, more and more
western dialectal features have been accepted into the literary language, in large part, no doubt,
due to the increasing influence of Sofia, which is located in the western part of the country, as the
new political center and as a rising cultural and economic influence.

yunanca

yunanca



https://yadi.sk/d/KN-BEJw2jkU2U


Linguaphone italian Egitim Seti

Linguaphone  italian  Egitim  Seti


https://yadi.sk/d/vV47eDwwjkT9A




Linguaphone Japanese Egitim Seti

Linguaphone Japanese Egitim Seti




https://yadi.sk/d/geQAJl3PjkRSq




nyūmon,
introduction
sono,
of which
ichi,
one


ohayō gozaimasu,
good morning


kiite ite kudasai,
please listen
kiite,
listening
kiku,
to listen
ite,
being
iru,
to be (referring to animate object)
kudasai,
please (imperative form of kudasaru)
kudasaru,
to give (to me) polite form


watashi wa Nihonjin desu,
I am Japanese
watashi wa,
I (subject), as for me
watashi,
1st person singular, I
wa,
as for
Nihonjin desu,
am (are, is) Japanese
Nihonjin,
Japanese
Nihon,
Japan
-jin,
people, nation, men, man, person
desu,
am (are, is) (polite form) (plain form: da)


sensei desu,
am (are, is) a teacher
sensei,
teacher


anata wa gaijin desu,
you are a foreigner
anata wa,
you (subject), as for you
anata,
you, second person singular
gaijin,
foreigner


seito desu,
are (am, is) a student
seito,
student


anata wa Nihonjin de wa arimasen,
you are not Japanese
de wa arimasen,
are (am, is) not
de wa,
indicating negative predicate
de,
indicating positive predicate
arimasen,
not to be (polite form (plain form: nai)
arimasu,
are (am, is) (poiite form)
aru,
to be (plain form)
-masen,
not to be (polite form)
 -masu,
to be (polite form)


Nihonjin wa Nhongo o hanashimasu,
the Japanese speak Japanese; a Japanese speaks Japanese
Nihongo o,
Japanese (language) (object)

farsça gramer kitabı

farsça gramer kitabı




In the composition of my Grammar, I have not been
dependent upon the works of others, but I have endeavoured
to draw materials from my own resources. The examples
and illustrations which have been cited throughout this work
will, therefore, be found to consist of such idiomatic expressions
as are used, in their daily intercourse, by those classes of
native Persians who speak the language in its greatest purity.






https://yadi.sk/i/snGerTVijkKwk

Oxford English Grammar Course Advanced with Answers

Oxford English Grammar Course Advanced with Answers

CD si ile beraber

1 After the accident, my father advised a lawyer A us to consult B consulting
2 I’m sorry, they don’t allow anybody here. A to smoke B smoking
3 Listen, can you hear him to himself? A talk B talking
4 Excuse me, would you like A to dance B dancing
5 I’ll always remember my first car. A to have bought B buying
6 If we take this afternoon off, it’ll mean extra hours tomorrow. A to work B working
7 I spent four hours writing my report, then stopped and went for a walk. A to work B working
8 I really love time at the seaside. A to spend B spending
9 If I’m going out for dinner, I like a small lunch. A to have B having
10 No matter how much they increase ticket prices, the trains are sure unreliable. A to stay B of staying
11 What do you intend after university? A to do B doing


https://yadi.sk/d/TFousYbMjkJrr


fransızca gramer kitabı

fransızca gramer kitabı


https://yadi.sk/i/lxULpR9bjkHMp



Bien des sourds ne comprennent pas ce qu’ils lisent. Ils associentles mots de la phrase comme ils associent les images qu’ils s’en donnent.Comment les aider à passer de la linéarité de la langue françaiseaux liens spatiaux qui mènent aux idées ?Le point de passage entre nos deux mondes ne peut être que le sens car seul le sens met en mouvement les idées et les formes dans la diversité des langues.Les enfants sourds – et bien d’autres – seraient heureux que l’on contraigne la grammaire scolaire à s’articuler au mouvementdes idées.C’est cet objectif que s’est assigné René Cerise en imaginant « la grammaire visuelle ». Une grammaire surprenante, séduisante,utile.



Karışık rusça kaynaklar

Karışık rusça kaynaklar

Читать    Okumak
Я не читаю    Ben oku-ma-m
Ты не читаешь   Sen oku-maz-sın
Он не читает    O oku-maz
Мы не читаем    Biz oku-ma-y-ız
Вы не читаете    Siz oku-maz-sınız
Они не читают    Onlar oku-maz-lar





İtalyanca dersleri

İtalyanca dersleri

https://yadi.sk/d/lHtk2JL9jkEbK


Dans le Nouvel Italien Sans Peine, nous vous présentons
une langue actuelle et « parlée », c'est-à-dire la
langue réellement utilisée aujourd'hui par les Italiens dans
les situations les plus diverses de la vie quotidienne :
demander un renseignement ou acheter quelque chose,
téléphoner ou aller chez le médecin... et pourquoi pas,
chercher un appartement ou un travail.
Tout en vous initiant aux structures fondamentales de
l'italien et au vocabulaire essentiel, nous avons essayé
de vous donner des éléments de civilisation, qui
constitueront pour vous une première approche de la vie
italienne d'aujourd'hui. Nous avons respecté le rythme
agréable et naturel d'Assimil.



13 Ekim 2015 Salı

Fluent English

Fluent English


https://yadi.sk/d/ABB4nNULjhoZU



Fluent English is a high intermediate-/advanced-level course in English as a second or
foreign language. It is designed to meet the needs of the intermediate-level student in
vocabulary, grammar, listening comprehension, idiomatic usage, and pronunciation. It
offers a great deal of practice in each of these areas, through both written exercises and
recorded materials. The language used in this course is realistic and practical, and the
situations in each of its twenty lessons offer a cultural context that will be recognizable
and relevant to most intermediate-level students of English.
The course is divided into twenty lessons covering a range of topics from small talk and
social situations, to telephones and business meetings, to computers, politics, and the
Internet. Each lesson offers essential vocabulary related to its topic, as well as important
phrasal verbs and idiomatic expressions that are typically challenging to the intermediatelevel
student. The lessons are divided into ten sections, each of which focuses on a
different English language skill:
• Say It Clearly! The first section of each lesson is a recorded pronunciation and
intonation warm-up. These sections focus on aspects of pronunciation and
intonation that are typically challenging for intermediate students of English —
consonant clusters, linking, reduced English, challenging sounds, etc.
• English at Work. The second section of each lesson features English in realistic
contexts, ranging from dialogues to recorded messages to readings. The English
at Work section is the cornerstone of each lesson, where the important
grammatical structures and vocabulary are demonstrated. These sections are all
recorded, giving the student an opportunity to hear and model native speakers.
• Build Your Vocabulary. The vocabulary section of each lesson includes
certain vocabulary from the English at Work section as well as other general
vocabulary related to the topic of the lesson. Each word or expression is
defined in simple English, and an example is given to show realistic usage.
• English Under the Hood. Each lesson focuses on three important grammatical
structures. Explanations are complete and straightforward, and plenty of examples
are given to demonstrate each construction in context. Each grammatical point is
also followed by a practice drill, giving the student a chance to practice and check
comprehension.
• Phrasal Verbs. Each lesson includes a list of important and common phrasal verbs
centered either on a common base verb, such as take or get, or a particular theme.
Each phrasal verb is clearly defined, and examples of usage follow each definition.
• Real English. Important idiomatic expressions related to the topic or theme of
each lesson are included in the Real English section. This section is in the form
of a short paragraph, where idiomatic expressions are used in context. The
student should be able to understand the meaning of each expression from
context, but each idiom is also defined in an appendix at the back of the book.
• Bring it All Together. Each lesson also includes five comprehensive review
exercises. The first exercise focuses on the vocabulary from the lesson, the next
three focus on

Collins Steven - Practical Everyday English

Collins Steven - Practical Everyday English

https://yadi.sk/d/mXd9xFScjhnwX



Step One
The first thing you must do is familiarise yourself with the textThis does not mean reading the
book word-for-word but simply getting to grips with the general layout of the chapters and the
philosophy behind the method.
Step Two
This book contains a wide range of formal and informal vocabulary which is essential for the
advanced level learner of English.The material is presented by way of practical examples which
usually contain words which the student will have studied at an earlier stage in the book.The
important thing for you to do at this stage is to ask yourself: “Are my students ready for this
level of English?”There is no point in teaching someone, for example, the difference between To
make a fuss and To make a fuss of (see Page 3) or complicated phrasal verbs such as To come
over (Page 12), if they cannot construct or understand basic English sentences.
Step Three
If the sudents are ‘up to it’, they should have a copy of the book which they should not bring to
class.They ought also to be told not to look ahead at the words they are going to study in the
lesson but only use the book at home for revision purposes.

TOEFL GRAMMAR REVIEW

TOEFL GRAMMAR REVIEW

https://yadi.sk/d/hZfO8nI5jhnL4

toefl ibt test book

toefl ibt test book

https://yadi.sk/i/Qy0QEUFUjhn9q



the economist

the economist


https://yadi.sk/i/xbh5LmqjjhmpB


The Pronunciation of English A Course Book - Charles W. Kreidler

The Pronunciation of English A Course Book - Charles W. Kreidler



https://yadi.sk/i/Vm8WorAkjhkK9



Each of the 14 chapters begins with one or more paragraphs which are
intended to tell briefly the content of the chapter. Each ends with a summary,
which briefly reviews the content of the chapter and also tries to show the importance
of what has been treated, or to describe some problems in analyzing not
taken up within the chapter. The last section, called Notes, suggests readings
in other books for those who want to extend their exploration of these topics.
Linguistics, like every academic discipline, has its own technical terms, and
some of them are used in this book. These terms are in bold print when they
are first introduced. Some of the terms, such as suffix, may already be familiar
to you; some, like allophone, are likely to be new; and some will probably be
familiar to you but you will find that they are used here in a more specialized
way; accent, assimilation, and stop are examples. The Glossary provides
definitions or explanations, with examples.
Description of pronunciations also requires the use of special symbols, which
are introduced from chapter 2 on. As with technical terms, several of these
symbols will be unfamiliar to you and some – ordinary letters of the Roman
alphabet – you will already know. But every symbol will consistently have
a specific value, always representing the same speech sound or phoneme.
Keep in mind that we are dealing with speech, not spelling, and that English
spelling does not consistently represent what people pronounce. When a
symbol – one or two letters – appears between slant lines, it represents an
English phoneme; for example, /k/ represents the phoneme that occurs at the
beginning of the words cat and kitten and in the middle of second, chicken,
token, and liquor. Symbols in square brackets represent speech sounds or phones;
cold and scold both have the phoneme /k/ but the phoneme is pronounced
with aspiration, [kh], in cold but without aspiration, [k], in scold. A tick (l) is
used to mark the stressed syllable of a word (the syllable following the tick);
for example, lorigin, olriginal, origilnality. Other special signs are explained as
they are introduced.

the future of creative writing

the future of creative writing

https://yadi.sk/i/EKYYj6Gqjhjis



The beginning of the 21st Century can rightly be referred to dually
as the Age of Creative Writing and the Age of the Zombie. We
might wonder if the two share a connection. By creative writing
I am of course referring to the acts and actions of human beings,
writing creatively. By zombie I am referring to the animated corpse
that, despite its various laudatory and memorable appearances in
numerous popular movies – the longing zombie, the lost zombie,
the homemaker zombie, the comedian zombie, the loving zombie,
the insatiably thirsty zombie, the child-like zombie, the friend
zombie – is bereft of consciousness, beyond any further ageing, and
essentially no more human than a gatepost.
Our recent enthusiasm for creative writing and our enthusiasm
for zombies have been so thorough and so strong that it is a surprise
there has not been occasional flesh-dripping protest against
these, even outright pitchfork-defying revolt. Those working in
academe might well admit to not being above some creative
writing and zombie profiteering. Again we can wonder: is there a
connection between these two things?

Spoken English Flourish Your Language

Spoken English Flourish Your Language

https://yadi.sk/i/03sI0jhnjhjX4


say it better in English

say it better in English

https://yadi.sk/i/K1Z9yCEIjhjG9



pronunciation pairs

pronunciation pairs

https://yadi.sk/i/Robj-7Ymjhizt


pronuance it perfectly in english

pronuance it perfectly in english



https://yadi.sk/i/l9cgkrsOjhiNi

phrasal verbs and idioms

phrasal verbs and idioms


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What is a phrasal verb?
A phrasal verb is a verb formed from two (or sometimes three) parts: a verb and an adverb or preposition.
These adverbs and prepositions are often called particles when they are used in a phrasal verb.
Most phrasal verbs are formed from a small number of verbs (for example, get, go, come, put and set) and a
small number of particles (for example, away, out, off, up and in).
Phrasal verbs sometimes have meanings that you can easily guess (for example, sit down or look for).
However, in most cases their meanings are quite different from the meanings of the verb they are formed
from. For example, hold up can mean 'to cause a delay' or 'to try to rob someone'. The original meaning of
hold (for example, to hold something in your hands) no longer applies.
There are five main types of phrasal verb. These are:
1. Intransitive phrasal verbs (= phrasal verbs which do not need an object).
For example: You're driving too fast. You ought to slow down.
2. Transitive phrasal verbs (= phrasal verbs which must have an object) where the object can come in
one of two positions:
(1) Between the verb and the particle(s).
For example: I think I'll put my jacket on.
or
(2) After the particle.
For example: I think I'll put on my jacket.


Oxford word skills

Oxford word skills



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Listen and Say It Right in English When to Use Formal and Everyday English - Nina Weinstein

Listen and Say It Right in English When to Use Formal and Everyday English - Nina Weinstein

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illustrated everyday expressions with stories

illustrated everyday expressions with stories

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The purpose of the Illustrated
Everyday Expressions with Stories
series is to introduce English language
learners to common idioms
through humorous examples and
illustrations. The lessons in this book
will both entertain and enlighten students
while providing exposure to
how each idiom can be used in a variety
of contexts.
Each lesson of this book begins
with a list of twenty target idioms.
The idioms are arranged alphabetically
throughout the book to help
students reference the idioms for
later use. After completing all the
units in the book, students may continue
to use Illustrated Everyday
Expressions with Stories series as a
humorous illustrated dictionary of
common idioms.
Within each lessons, target idioms
are first defined for students. The definitions
may explain the idiom in
simple terms or use synonyms or
other idioms to build a student's
understanding of the meaning underlying
each idiom. Each definition is
then followed by sample sentences
and short dialogs using the idiom in
context. Finally, idioms are illustrated
with humorous illustrations which
can help build a memorable picture
of each idiom's usage in the reader's
mind.
Following the definitions and
examples of the target idioms is an
exercise page for students to practice
their understanding of idioms from
the lesson. These pages include
matching exercises and a multiplechoice
exercise to practice both
idioms learned in each lesson along
with recycled idioms from previous
lessons. For this reason, students are
encouraged to progress through the
book in the order the lessons are presented
to be sure they have covered
all of the idioms used for the exercise
pages.
The final page of each lesson presents
an international folktale incorporating
the idioms presented in the
lesson. These folktales give students
additional exposure to idiom usage in
context, as well as providing extended
reading practice along with an
entertaining presentation of the target
idioms. Teachers using Illustrated
Everyday Expressions with Stories 1
in the classroom can use the folktales
as a springboard for discussion of
similar stories within the cultures
represented in the classroom.
The Illustrated Everyday
Expressions with Stories series provides
students a with a useful
approach to learning common
English idioms. Students will also
have fun in the learning process. We
hope that you enjoy using Illustrated
Everyday Expressions with Stories.

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